Tag: Jackson Rubio

March 4, 2022

Song of the Day: Brainwash Projects - Want for Nada

If anyone asked me to name my favorite Christian hip-hop project of all time, it is without a doubt Brainwash Projects, and their sole album The Rise and Fall of . . . . Perhaps the album title was a hint at how long the project would last, and we all just missed it at the time. Rise and Fall had everything: lyrical witticisms, dope beats, funky rhymes, and humor by the bucketloads. While the whole album is worth listening to straight through without skipping any tracks, one of the strongest singles is “Want for Nada,” a testimony to God’s faithfulness.… Continued →

November 5, 2021

Song of the Day: scaterd-few - U

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Sin Disease is one of the greatest albums ever to emerge from our scene. Romald Domkus (born Allan Aguirre) and company unleashed a wonderfully chaotic debut album, with production from Terry Taylor (DA/Daniel Amos/Swirling Eddies/Lost Dogs) that set CCM on its head! Think I’m overstating things? Not possible. Here’s why: have you ever tried to pigeonhole the album, or this band, into a single genre? Good luck.… Continued →

October 1, 2021

Song of the Day: Havalina Rail Co. - I Change My Clothes

Havalina Rail Co. was a delightfully quirky, eccentric, genre-fusing and genre-bending experimental band from California. Across their 10-year career (give or take), the band dabbled in folk, ska, jazz, ragtime, blues, Americana, surf, and multiple internationally-themed genres. No two albums in their canon treads the same ground, and yet each successive opus is clearly recognizable as Havalina. The band stopped recording as HRC somewhere in the early 00s, but members have turned up elsewhere. Most notably are Matt Wignall who is a renowned photographer and is perhaps now best known as the producer for several Cold War Kids albums.… Continued →

September 18, 2020

Song of the Day: Blaster the Rocket Man - Hopeful Monsters Are Dying Every Day

Film director Guillermo del Toro and spastic hardcore punk band Blaster the Rocket Man have at least one thing in common. Whereas most of society, and particularly within Christianity, monsters are usually the bad guys, these two artistic entities–operating in disparate fields as the case may be–often take the side of the monster. Pan’s Labyrinth, for instance, juxtaposes the kind but terrifying Pan against the inhuman, yet human, monsters of the Spanish fascists under Francisco Franco.… Continued →